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Conversation Piece

MARS Gallery, Melbourne
(2016)

Matthew Stanton’s 16mm film installation “Conversation Piece” contemplates the nature of the portrait image in relationship to topologies of surface and duration whilst examining the imprinting, transmission and translation of the “time image” through the cinematographic process. Referencing the 7-minute exposure times typical of Julia Margaret Cameron’s 19th century photographic portraits, ‘Conversation Piece’ constitutes dual durational projections of a woman and the sea, each mirrored in scale and static frame. The ocean surface echoes and reflects the contingencies of light and human presence as a mute conversation unfolds between converging dualities – the static and animate, surface and depth, the actual and the virtual.

'Deep North'

Wallflower Photomedia Gallery
(2015)

An exhibition of photographic and video works which chart the waterways, surfaces and stilled recesses of North Eastern Australia’s wet tropical landscapes whilst examining the inscriptions and erasures played out within its storied topographies. Themes pertaining to the superimposition, dislocation and convergence of spatial histories, both cultural and personal are central to the work. The dialogue engendered provides an opportunity to navigate the interface between the Cartesian empiricism of exploration and the persistence of an invisible mythical space-time within the landscape.

37° South to 19° North: Australian Photography
(Curated by Daniel Armstrong)

The Museum of the City of Cuernavaca, Mexico
(September - October 2015)

“The title for this exhibition (37 ° South to 19 ° North) refers to the Latitude of Melbourne, Australia and Cuernavaca, Mexico. My curatorial objective for making such a reference to the geographical was to invoke a sense of both distance and connection between the two locations of Australia and Mexico and to also create a sense of sharing, not only between our distant landscapes and cultures but also between the feelings and emotions that we all experience in response to the places in which we live out the moments which make up our daily lives. These images are not documents but rather representations of feelings, stories, memories and dreams which emerge in the milieu of our inhabitants” (Daniel Armstrong)

Slide Night #2

Westspace
(2013)

Taking the form of projected unique state silver gelatine pinhole transparencies this series is an exploration of the threshold between indexicality and diffraction. Photography’s conflation of time and space into surface are examined in dialogue with Alvin Lucier’s inquiry into the spatio-temporal decay of recorded sound.

Psych-O-Tropica

MARS
(2012)

A showcase of the work of 20 emergent and established artists who have called Far North Queensland home. Despite the tyranny of distance from major capitals the artists are sustaining practices that have a symbiotic relationship with big cities and remote regions alike. Curated by Samuel Tupou. * Text from exhibition catalogue

Bristol Biennial - Pulse of Duration

The Looking Glass Art Space
(2012)

‘Conversation Piece’ is a 16mm film and sound installation contemplating the nature of the portrait image in relationship to conceptions of surface, space and duration. Referencing the 7-minute exposures typical of Julia Margaret Cameron’s 19th century photographic portraits, the work constitutes a durational portrait and seascape mirrored in scale and static frame. The shifting play of light and motion upon surfaces of sea and sky echo physical contingencies of presence whilst functioning as both psychological field and screen. Between the lucent frames a mute conversation emerges between surface and depth, the static and the animate, the actual and the virtual.

Obscura

TCB art Inc.
(2007)

Shown as a part of ‘Obscura’ ‘Prescience #2’ is a three screen, four minute video piece that considers the irresolvable relationship between the stasis of photography and the desire as evoked in Catherine Upton’s ‘Memory’s Apostle’ “to possess the presence of that which is forever absent”. Curated by Timothy Hillier.